FSCO: Protect Yourself from Fraud After a Collision

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Toronto, ON (Mar. 24, 2013) – Today, the Financial Services Commission of Ontario and the Toronto Police Service launched a series of Public Service Announcements (PSAs) on what drivers should do after a collision to protect themselves from fraud.

The PSAs are accompanied by helpful infographics and cover Information drivers should collect at the scene of a collision, How to report a collision, and Decisions drivers need to make following a collision. Click an infographic below to view the PSA on YouTube.

“Don’t let yourself become a victim of fraud. Be alert for signs or behaviours that suggest a staged collision. Record all relevant details and take pictures, if you can. This information will help us, help you,” says Constable Clinton Stibbe of Toronto Police Service’s Traffic Services Unit.

Philip Howell, CEO and Superintendent of Financial Services, adds “By being vigilant, Ontario drivers can help stop fraudsters who abuse the auto insurance system and take money out of drivers’ pockets through higher premiums.”

If consumers suspect insurance fraud, they should report it to police, Crime Stoppers [New Window] (1-800-222-TIPS) or FSCO.

2 - Report Collision 3 - Avoid Fraud

Quick Facts

  • In its Final Report, Ontario’s Auto Insurance Anti-Fraud Task Force concluded that fraud in the auto insurance system is substantial and has a significant impact on premiums.
  • The Task Force’s Final Report contains 38 targeted recommendations on four key areas: fraud prevention, detection, investigation and enforcement and regulatory roles and responsibilities.
  • It’s estimated that GTA drivers pay as high as $540 more on their auto insurance each year as a result of fraud, according to research conducted by Ontario’s Auto Insurance Anti-Fraud Task Force.

About the Financial Services Commission of Ontario

FSCO is an agency of the Ministry of Finance established under the Financial Services Commission of Ontario Act, 1997. It regulates insurance, pension plans, loan and trust companies, credit unions and caisses populaires, co-operative corporations and mortgage brokerages and administrators in Ontario.

FSCO investigates allegations of misconduct, unfair practices and non-compliance with legislation or regulations in its regulated sectors. When warranted, FSCO takes enforcement action.

SOURCE: Financial Services Commission of Ontario